CumuLogic has launched a PaaS designed to make it easier to deploy Java applications on HP Cloud Services.

CumuLogic PaaS for HP Cloud Services is being offered to customers on a 30-day trial basis, after which a $200 per developer per month price tag kicks in. The company isn't forgetting about its channel partners, either, with plans to offer partner-enabled services for onboarding and supporting customers.

Targeted at Global 2000 companies, the PaaS is being positioned as a sandbox for enterprises to use to evaluate a cloud platform for development, migration and deployment of Java applications during the trial period. For those who decide they like what they see, the CumuLogic platform will help Java developers to quickly create and deploy applications on HP Cloud Services.

Enterprises are also able to test the feasibility of using HP's public cloud with CumuLogic's platform for development and QA environments.

Customers will no doubt find the CumuLogic PaaS for HP Cloud Services helpful, but the real message here seems to be for partners that are tasked with building and deploying Java-based apps for their customers. Saving time in application development and deployment helps all involved, and it lets partners increase their productivity and focus on other key aspects of their businesses.

"CumuLogic with HP Cloud Services deliver the features and performance required by enterprise developers to develop and scale cloud-based applications," said company president and CEO Mike Soby in a prepared statement.

This announcement follows less than two months after CumuLogic announced the launch of its Cloud Application Platform v1.0, which the company designed to redefine Java PaaS. Now with the launch of a PaaS specifically tailored to HP Cloud Services, the company is continuing on with its cloud strategy.

CumuLogic primarily goes to market through channel partners, so there should be opportunities for cloud services providers and software developers. The company is in the process of trying to bring Java to most clouds.

Developers can request a free account on the company's website.