Data backup vendor STORServer is getting into the increasingly competitive cloud-based backup and disaster recovery space with the launch of three cloud services for the midmarket. Known for its backup and recovery appliances, STORServer's first entries in the cloud space put it firmly in the realm of both public and private cloud backup services.

STORServer is putting its appliances to work as cloud offerings, and the company is selling its services with a "data recovery guarantee," which promises customers that not only will they get their data back should they suffer a loss, but the data will be useable once recovered. STORServer uses IBM (NYSE: IBM) Tivoli Storage Manager as the software foundation to its hardware appliances, and aside from the fact these services are being offered in the cloud, it doesn't look like it is changing much by way of its automated backup processes.

The company's first cloud services include disaster recovery to a private cloud, disaster recovery to a public cloud and backup, archiving and disaster recovery to a public cloud.

The private cloud version is available to existing IBM Tivoli Storage Manager and STORServer customers and includes a STORServer Backup Appliance for automated disaster recovery. The cloud offering is aimed at midmarket companies interested in moving away from tape backups or those who simply yet have a disaster recovery solution in place.

The public cloud cloud offering has been designed as a service that offers disaster recovery on a space basis (cost per Gigabyte or Terabyte) to replicate data from an existing Tivoli Storage Manager or STORServer Backup Appliance to a certified StorServer public cloud provider. No additional onsite hardware or software investment is necessary.

The offering for backup, archive and disaster recovery to a public cloud skips the onsite hardware requirement entirely, so customers who choose this route do not require a Tivoli Storage Manager or STORServer Backup Appliance investment at all. It's for customers looking for a complete hands-off approach or those who have no interest in the expenses of a hardware product. Based on the information provided by STORServer, it looks to be more of a pure cloud service play rather than a hybrid solution.

STORServer sells its appliances exclusively through its reseller channel, but the company didn't provide details on how its partners will fit into the cloud offerings. It seems clear the public and private disaster recovery offerings could be positioned as an extra value-add the channel could offer. As to the pure cloud play, we'll have to wait to see how STORServer goes to market. The company's isn't known for its direct sales, so the channel will likely play a role.