Redis Labs has released the results of a database survey it conducted earlier this year at AWS re:Invent. The purpose of the survey was, at least in part, to get a better sense as to how developers are using and engaging with cloud-based databases.

Cameron Peron, Redis Labs' vice president of marketing, noted in a blog post that "We've spent 2014 getting to know developers who are building a wide range of new era and enterprise applications on cloud infrastructure solutions like Amazon Web Services (AWS)."

For the company's report, it surveyed 126 developers at the popular Amazon conference, asking them about their database needs and existing deployments.

Here are a few of the key findings from that survey:

  • The biggest database challenge is performance. Almost 60 percent of the respondents indicated performance as being among their greatest database challenges.
  • As a challenge, scalability isn't far behind. More than 50 percent of respondents indicated that scalability was among their greatest database challenges.
  • Availability and flexibility rounded out the top four biggest database challenges.
  • The favorite programming language is Python, which was cited as being used by nearly 50 percent of the respondents. Others vying for the popularity contest included Java (in the number two position), Ruby (number three) and C# .NET (number four).
  • MySQL seems to have taken a strong lead in relational databases among developers that are attended AWS re:Invent. According to Redis Labs, more than 70 percent of the developers surveyed use MySQL. And it has a rather large lead on the number two relational database -- namely, SQL Server, which is being used by a little less than 40 percent of the surveyed developers.
  • More than 45 percent of respondents use a NoSQL database, of which the most popular is MongoDB, followed by Memcached and Redis.
  • Developers using Redis cited performance as their number one reason for choosing Redis.

"The goal of this survey was to show how a sample of the developer community engages with various databases," Peron wrote.