Public cloud may get the most attention, but it's private clouds that companies are turning to for their cloud services and applications needs.

According to a poll of 600 worldwide decision-makers conducted by Current Analysis, 58 percent of the respondents that indicated their organizations use cloud services have based those services on private cloud infrastructure. Twenty-eight percent of those private cloud users have extended their cloud infrastructures to include the public cloud to form a hybrid cloud environment.

Part of the reason for the growth in private cloud is simply that many organizations just don't trust the security of public cloud services and infrastructures. An overwhelming majority of respondents listed security and data privacy as their top two issues in undertaking cloud initiatives, essentially validating the private and hybrid cloud markets, according to Current Analysis.

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A few of the other key findings from the report include:

  • Although security and data privacy are still the top concerns among IT managers, their organizations "can still benefit from the efficiency of cloud technology by adopting a private cloud solution."
  • The first step in delivering next-generation IT services is in "a well-planned private cloud strategy."
  • Private cloud-based infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and software-as-a-service (SaaS) functionalities "can be easily customised to meet the specific needs of both internal and external IT users."
  • Increasing interest in hybrid cloud "means that a good private cloud solution must offer the flexibility to extend to include a variety of public cloud offerings as needs change."

"The public cloud is here to stay, having proven its value within the mid-market through sheer economies of scale, but an even deeper value arises from an increased level of platform standardisation and service orchestration often associated with platforms such as Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud Platform," said Brad Shimmin, service director for business technology and software at Current Analysis, in a prepared statement.

"It was inevitable that enterprise customers would begin looking for similar capabilities within their own data centers, building service layers capable of emulating and even connecting with the public cloud, all from within trusted corporate confines," he said.