IBM today moved to put its stamp on hybrid cloud computing with the launch of a raft of services that blur the line between public and private cloud computing.

Announced at the IBM InterConnect Cloud 2015 conference, Robert LeBlanc, senior vice president for IBM Cloud, said IBM now provides visibility and control over cloud computing better than anybody in the industry.

At the core of that claim is a new orchestration service based on IBM's implementation of OpenStack designed for hybrid cloud computing environments; a Secure Passport Gateway that makes it simpler to securely access data stored locally from with a cloud applications via a single point of control; and an API Harmony service that makes it simpler to identify the relationship between different sets of APIs.

In addition, IBM announced that via support for Docker application programming interfaces (APIs) it is now possible to store data in the cloud or locally and then move it to be processed in either environment. In effect, LeBlanc says that IBM has removed the friction associated with running code anywhere by adding networking technology to Docker containers that IBM has patented.

LeBlanc said this capability is critical to not only optimize the performance of hybrid cloud applications, but also make it simple to comply with various data sovereignty regulations that have cropped up around the world.

As a complement to that capability, IBM also launched IBM DataWorks, a service through which organizations can isolate who gets access to a particular data set.

Click here for Talkin' Cloud's Top 100 CSP list

IBM also announced that it will make local instance of its Bluemix integration software available in a form that can be deployed on premise as a private cloud, and that it is creating a Watson Zone on Bluemix to centralize access to Watson application programming interfaces.

Finally, IBM announced that it has formed alliances with CSC and Tech Mahindra under which those two integrators will develop applications and provide services that will be delivered via the IBM Bluemix integration platform and that it has extended the number of IBM SoftLayer data centers it makes available to include Montreal and Sydney.

In a world where there is no such thing as a single cloud, LeBlanc says it critical for solution providers and their customers to be able to federate IT services across multiple private and public clouds.

LeBlanc made it more than clear that IBM is trying to essentially isolate rivals such Amazon Web Services (AWS) as providers of a public cloud service that in of itself doesn't meet the demands of hybrid cloud computing environments that are rapidly becoming the de facto way that going forward modern enterprise IT environments will be managed.